Warner/Chappell responds to Radiohead vs Lana Del Rey lawsuit reports

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Yesterday news broke that Radiohead were reportedly suing Lana Del Rey for copyright infringement over similarities between ‘Creep’ and her own ‘Get Free’.

The news spread after Del Rey, who is published by Sony/ATV, said via Twitter that the band were demanding 100% of the publishing for her track.

Today Radiohead publisher Warner/Chappell has released a statement denying the lawsuit, but confirming that they are seeking writing credits.

A spokesperson said: “As Radiohead’s music publisher, it’s true that we’ve been in discussions since August of last year with Lana Del Rey’s representatives.

“It’s clear that the verses of ‘Get Free’ use musical elements found in the verses of ‘Creep’ and we’ve requested that this be acknowledged in favour of all writers of ‘Creep’.”

warner/chappell spokesperson

“It’s clear that the verses of ‘Get Free’ use musical elements found in the verses of ‘Creep’ and we’ve requested that this be acknowledged in favour of all writers of ‘Creep’. 

“To set the record straight, no lawsuit has been issued and Radiohead have not said they “will only accept 100%” of the publishing of ‘Get Free’.”

On Sunday Del Rey tweeted: “It’s true about the lawsuit.

“Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by Creep, Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing.”

lana del rey

“Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by Creep, Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing – I offered up to 40 over the last few months but they will only accept 100.

“Their lawyers have been relentless, so we will deal with it in court.”

‘Creep’ battled its own copyright infringement lawsuit when it was released back in ’92 for a resemblance to The Hollies’ ’74 track ‘The Air That I Breathe’, which is also published by Sony/ATV in the US and Canada, and Imagem in Europe.

Subsequently, writers Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood have a share of the seminal Radiohead track.

‘Get Free’ appeared on Del Rey’s latest album, Lust for Life, which hit No.1 in the US and the UK last year.

Alongside Del Rey, its writers include Kieron Menzies and Rick Nowels.Music Business Worldwide

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  • Tom Salvatori

    Wow, it seems so obvious. How did NO ONE throughout the song’s production – from the composers, to the musicians through to the engineers and the suits – stand up and say…”um…ya know this song is a total lift of Creep” – someone HAD to hear it…no?